Just Call Me Poi . . . or Not

By | August 19, 2014

It’s happened again. A title has been converted into a name in data oblivion and sent as part of a personalized mailing.

This example is taken from a business mailing to my home addressed to “Poi LLC.” The assumption is that “Poi” stands for Person of Interest, converted into sentence case the same way my father-in-law’s suffix USMC has been converted to his last name: Mr. Usmc.

What’s odd is that this is a residential neighborhood, so you would assume that since the mailer is addressed to a business, the marketer knows that unlike my neighbors, I’m registered as a business. But if they know that, they should also know my business’s name isn’t Poi.

What’s unfortunate is that, like one of the last butchered direct mail campaigns I have received, it is coming from a company that ought to know better: American Express. It’s marketing gold cards. The last butchered mailings I’ve written about have come from Geico and Weis Markets, a large regional grocery store chain (that one was addressed to my husband’s ex-wife, who has never lived at that address . . . or even in the state).

We read the survey results, but when we look in our mailboxes, we see it in person. The state of data is often dreadful. Marketers ought to know better, and I suppose they do. But data cleanliness seems to be a luxury they don’t want to bother to afford. They’d rather trust in volume. Let the embarrassments slip as long as they do better than break even.

When your customers seem content to let volume override data errors, what do YOU do? How do you try to break through the malaise and get them to take their data management seriously? I’d like to hear your ideas.

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