Comcast Bills Call Customers Nasty Names

By | February 10, 2015

Your client’s customer database — its most precious resource. Used for invoicing, customer communications, and as a critical source of data for their marketing list, the customer database is your client’s lifeblood. How easily can it be compromised? A recent Comcast horror story shows just how easily.

One customer, Mary, continually had trouble with her service. After 39 service calls, she finally got a regular picture on her television screen. Once the technical issue was resolved, however, the bills stopped coming . . . four months in a row.  Now hot under the collar, Mary called to find out what was happening. No name calling. No swearing. But, she admits, she was hot.

She finally received her bill, all right. It was addressed to “Super B-tch Bauer.” A little digging found that another customer had recently received a bill addressed to “A–hole Brown.”

Comcast says it is investigating.

These are great water-cooler stories, but there is a deeper issue here for printers and their customers. How well protected are your clients’ customer or marketing database? How often are those lists scrubbed? updated? profiled? How are your clients ensuring that their most precious marketing resource is giving them maximum value and not unintentionally undermining efforts at targeting and personalization with out-of-date information, duplicates, and dirty fields?

If your clients aren’t already proactively maintaining their databases, isn’t this something as a service provider you might want to be nudging them about?

Super B Bauer

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One thought on “Comcast Bills Call Customers Nasty Names

  1. Jean-Marie Hershey

    As a Comcast customer, I can think of a few choice descriptors to enclose with our monthly payment for (and I use the term loosely) “services rendered.”

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