Archive for the ‘Direct Mail’ Category

Survey: 23% of Retailers See 11% Cumulative Lift Using Personalization

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014

If you want to know how your customers and prospects expect to be marketed to (what they set as their norms), look at retailing. To this end, the study “Personalization Comes of Age: 2014 Retailing and Consumer Insights” from the e-tailing group, is very enlightening.

According to the study, the top seven things on marketers’ “to do” lists are as follows:

  1. Mobile (including tablet)
  2. Marketing
  3. Personalization
  4.  Omni-channel
  5. Platform
  6. Conversion Optimization
  7. Analytics, Reporting, Big Data

So personalization comes in behind mobile and marketing. This isn’t any surprise since most of us expect (or even rely) on personalized product recommendations when we shop online. What may be a surprise is that retailers have actually quantified the reasons why.

Nearly one-quarter (23%) of retailers responding to the survey see a 11% cumulative lift using personalization. This is up from only 19% of retailers giving this answer one year ago.  More retailers are also seeing greater value in longer-term lifecycle personalization, up from 15% one year ago.

These are encouraging numbers. While there will be differences in retail that do not exist in print (such as focus on online activities such as shopping cart abandonment and real-time personalization online), people are still people. Done right, personalization isn’t going to be effective online and not in print. People’s internal wiring doesn’t work that way.

Personalization still has to be done right, but the increase in the percentage of retailers who see benefits from personalization, including long-term lifecycle personalization, suggests that as they get better at it, the benefits increase, too. Jumps in the numbers from 2013 -to 2014 mean that retailers are getting better at it — and your clients can too.

If retailers are improving their personalization efforts and reaping the benefits, your customers can do the same.

 

Survey: Data Collection on the Rise

Friday, July 18th, 2014

Don’t let your customers fool you — they may have more data than you think. According to polling conducted by Digiday and Neustar in June 2014, 76% of U.S. digital media and marketing professionals are collecting data on current and potential customers and 77% have increased their data collection over the past year.

The number one reason? To get a better understanding of their customers, with 57% giving this answer.  Marketers indicated that they are expanding the volume and type of data they are collecting — demographic, psychographic, location, and social.

Screen Shot 2014-07-16 at 2.31.34 PMThis is good news for 1:1 print providers, since data availability has been one of the Achilles heels of this process. But the challenges of data silos and data integration remain. In fact, according to the research, half of respondents say they are still unable to link data to create individual customer profiles.

Still, on the whole, this is good news. The more customers focus on data collection, integration, and profiling, the more natural the pathway to discussions about how you can help. So these data represent ongoing challenges, but they present opportunities, too.

 

3D Adoption and the National Retail Print Shops

Wednesday, July 9th, 2014

3D printing is a topic I’ve written a lot about lately, and the commercial printing industry is still trying to figure out how it fits — or if it fits — into the mix. I’ve written a number of posts on 3D printing over the past several months, so I won’t repeat my comments here (I will post links to previous posts below). Instead, I want to offer this simple food for thought.

  • Staples in The Netherlands is currently offering its own 3D printing service, Easy 3D, similar to the Shapeways model. We must believe something similar is in the works here in the United States.
  • The UPS Store already has six beta sites for 3D printing. The Kearny Mesa store has done extremely well with this technology, even garnering a feature write-up in Forbes.
  • Other big box retailers with printing services are scrutinizing the technology, as well. Active research is being done not just into 3D printing, but into the kinds of marketing applications I’ve talked about here on Digital Nirvana and have been encouraging the printing industry to consider for about a year now.

There has been a lot of water cooler talk about why 3D printing is not a good model for commercial printers — that its product manufacturing, prototyping, and consumer tschotkes are too far flung from the commercial printing model — but I continue to suggest that this is the wrong way to think about 3D printing.

3D printing must be seen in light of its opportunities to drive marketing campaigns. This means incentives and response drivers for the kinds of jobs commercial printers are already doing. Printers don’t even have to do the 3D printing themselves. These models work even if you outsource the production to someone else.

I don’t believe 3D printing is something this industry can afford to ignore. If you don’t start thinking about it now, the inevitable entry of the national retailers into this market will drive printers to play catch-up in the future. I am seeing more and more signs of serious interest from the national chains, so this is something printers need to take seriously.

Catch-up is never a good place to be!

Links to previous Digital Nirvana posts on 3D printing:

3D Printing: Thoughts from Around the Industry

Solving a Problem with 3D Printing: Part 1

Solving a Problem with 3D Printing: Part 2

Using 3D Printing to Drive Digital Print Marketing

Business Models for 3D Printing in the Commercial Printing Industry

 

How Do You Handle Gut-Driven Marketers?

Sunday, July 6th, 2014

According to a new study from The Economist Intelligence Unit, sponsored by Applied Predictive Technologies (APT), senior managers and executives are most likely to say their marketing decisions are driven by data, but when it comes right down to it, they are more likely to trust their own intuition.

When asked to characterize their individual decision-making style, 42% of respondents say they are data-driven (“I collect and analyze data as much as possible before making a decision”), more than cited any other option. However, 73% also say that, when it comes to decision-making, they trust their own intuition.

Kind of like overriding your Garmin when you think you know the better way to go.

Furthermore, if their gut contradicts the data, only 10% of respondents said they’d follow the data. More than half (57%) said they’d re-analyze the data instead (until they could make it agree with their intuition perhaps?)

One of the benefits of data-driven campaigns is, well, the data. Finding trends, developing customer profiles, and understanding customer preferences and behavior are foundational to the value of personalization in print and multi-channel marketing. These results suggest challenges for MSPs relying on data to prove value or help their clients increase the value of their campaigns.

What would you do if you ran into a key decision-maker unwilling to trust the company’s own data? What would you do?

To download a PDF of the survey, click here.

Saying “Sorry” Feels Better in Print

Friday, June 20th, 2014

Speaking of the benefits and value of print (see Tuesday’s post), this morning I bear a tale of two apologies.

Several weeks ago, Shutterfly mistakenly sent a promotion to thousands of customers congratulating them on new parenthood and encouraging them to preserve their memories with a photo book. Unfortunately, many of the recipients were not new parents. I was one of the recipients of that apology.

Shutterfly has since corrected its email mistake with a follow up apology. “We mistakenly sent an email that was intended only for new parents who recently made baby-related purchases at Shutterfly,” reads the email. “We’re truly sorry if you received this email in error. We realize this is a very sensitive issue and we did not mean to upset you in any way.”

It happens. Ho, hum.

This week, my father also received an apology. This time, it was for messing up his name. This apology, however, came by mail. It was printed on an oversized glossy postcard.

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The subject line of his email was, “Doing things right.” In it, my father wrote:

The message came on a glossy, full-color, heavy-weight card, 8 1/2 by  5 1/2 inches, not just a little postcard. Pretty nice gesture. It  cost a little send it, I’m sure.

It costs more to send direct mail than email, but it sure sends a different impression. Direct mail costs more, but perhaps that’s one of the reasons its impact is greater, too. It is a much more credible way to say “I’m sorry” than an email that costs little or nothing to send.

Get Your (Augmented) Reality Check!

Friday, June 13th, 2014

You’ve heard about Google Glass(es) before, right? But have you seen those magazine advertisements that come to life on your smart phone? You might be thinking of QR codes, which isn’t too far off, but I’m referring specifically to a leading-edge technology that facilitates the most digitally enhanced communication pieces. The technology, Augmented Reality (AR), consists of software integrations to marketing pieces that add layers of digital content (photos, videos, sound effects, games) to a printed advertisement. With AR, a traditional print ad becomes an interactive communications tool that can be used to further inform consumers, gather consumer information, offer promotions, and create deeper brand experiences. At the end of the day, AR helps maximize ad shelf-life and foster consumer dialogue.

To get a better understanding of key applications and examples of AR, I encourage you to check out the recent webinar sponsored by Canon Solutions America titled “A Reality Check: Augmented Reality.” The webinar defines and exemplifies how AR interacts within both print and marketing communities. Barbara Pellow of Info Trends leads a conversation with Martin Ahe (Partnerships Manager at Layer) and Deborah Haskel (VP of Marketing at IWCO Direct) surrounding AR value and its implementation process.

Today, there are five critical trends associated with AR technology. The first involves an embedment of AR technology in ‘wearables’. Google Glass(es) are just one example, where the ‘wearer’ issues a verbal command to scan and perform a certain task. The second and third trends leverage AR to enhance the brand experience in retail and at live-events, like concerts. The fourth surrounds AR involvement in the educational space with do-it-yourself learning tools, like books and student projects. Lastly, AR has patterns of success in the automobile industry specifically. From sales brochures to owner’s manuals, brands like Ford, Volvo, Nissan, and Audi are using AR to interact, inform, educate, and strengthen relationships with their customers.

With AR growing in popularity in a variety of fields, you might be asking: “How do I start the implementation process today? And what does that process look like in conjunction with direct mail or printed communications pieces?” One way to start is by consulting the firm Layer, who is at the forefront of the AR industry. Ahe explains that the implementation process unfolds in a couple of simple, user-friendly steps:
1. In Layer Creator, upload a page that you wish to make interactive
2. Drag, drop and specify what you would like to link
3. Click publish

It’s important to remember, however, that the majority of customers are new AR technology. Thus, make sure to keep your blends simple, intuitive, and user-friendly. Haskel highlights: “In order to make effective use of AR, you have to help your clients understand the best way to use it. Think quality over quantity.” Content size (video, imaging, etc.) and the appropriate ‘call to action’ are two major components in creating a successful AR experience. And be sure to educate your audience. Many consumers are used to scanning QR codes where you only scan the small square with your smart phone. But with AR, you scan a larger area, usually the entire printed area, with your smart phone. Since this is a relatively new technology, it’s helpful to provide some direction on your printed piece for the consumer.

Get started today by checking out the webinar for classic examples and further details on the implementation process. It’s no wonder AR is here to stay when a brand can tell a story like this! Consider this your (augmented) reality check!

Are You Missing an Opportunity to Help Clients with Data?

Friday, June 13th, 2014

According to a recent study from NetProspex (“State of Marketing Data: 2014″), B2B marketers are missing basic and easily accessible information to help with their personalization and targeting efforts.  Twenty-six percent do not even know the contact’s industry and 20% don’t know their revenues or number of employees.

What’s notable here is that this type of information is readily accessible from data houses and relatively inexpensive to acquire, yet it can make a tremendous difference in the ability to segment and target communications.

I often hear marketers talking about how easy to is to lose sales simply because you forgot to ask. You laid out the information, but there was no call to action. The same principle applies here. If your clients could be doing more segmentation and targeting but aren’t, have you simply asked them what fields they have in their marketing database and offered to fill in ones that are missing? This is a basic data append that any PSP should be able to handle working with one of the major list companies.

Which clients could you approach today with an ask?

Percentage of Records with the Fields Completed

First name 77.5%
Last name 76.0%
Title 62.9%
Street 54.6%
City 59.6%
Phone 36.2%
Email 89.2%
State 58.5%
Company 77.2%
Industry 25.9%
Revenue 18.2%
Employees 19.5%

Source: State of Marketing Data: NetProspex (2014)

Direct Mail: The Power of Consistency

Friday, May 9th, 2014

Last Friday, I posted about a conversation I had with Mark Pageau, vp sales at Darwill, about how direct mail results can be sabotaged by post-mail factors unrelated to the mailing itself and, consequently, the importance of helping marketers think through the entire sales funnel when results are not what they expect.

Another issue that has been raised around the topic is consistency.  Too often, companies evaluate the power of direct mail based on a single campaign when, in fact, customers often need repeated exposure before they will buy. If a single campaign doesn’t produce results, it may not because “direct mail doesn’t work.” It may be that the product or service is one that customers don’t purchased based on a single contact.

Mark Zazeela, a shipping and mailing consultant based in New York City, has noted:

Many [marketers] don’t seem to understand the power of creating brand awareness. Brand awareness does not happen with one mailing. Brand awareness is created through a well planned and executed campaign.

Think of some of the most ubiquitous consumer brands. They are constantly creating new advertising. They understand that one television commercial or one magazine ad will not build a market following. They repeat, repeat, and repeat again.

Mail one time and wonder why it didn’t get you what you expected? There are so many reasons why people don’t respond to the first offer. They forgot. They misplaced the mailer. The timing was not right. They didn’t give it their full attention. Lots more reasons.

When thinking about direct mail, think of a campaign, not just a mailing. Think of it as an investment, not just an expense.

Laura Stamps of Kittyfeather Press, adds:

I usually give a prospect an entire year of regular mailings before I move that name to a less frequent list. I’ve been using direct mail for 27 years, and it doesn’t take long to realize what you’re saying is very true. So many times I’ll receive an envelope stuffed with 6 months worth of flyers and a check. That’s the beauty of direct mail. If a prospect is too busy to respond immediately she/he will often save your mailing and respond later, even 6 months or a year later. Direct mail is definitely “sticky,” but only if you’re patient and consistent.

So if your clients are kicking back against direct mail results, maybe the answer isn’t to mail less — it’s to mail more!

“My Direct Mail Isn’t Working”

Saturday, May 3rd, 2014

I’m sure you’ve heard this as an excuse not to print direct mail, right? I had a fascinating discussion with Mark Pageau, vp sales at Darwill, yesterday about this very topic. You know how he responds? He asks a question: “What’s happening in the rest of your sales funnel?”

Mark has discovered that, very often, when people complain that their direct mail isn’t effective, they have other challenges in their pipeline that have nothing to do with direct mail. The direct mail may be great. It may be well written. There may be a compelling incentive. Based on the direct mail pieces, people may be going to the website or making a phone call. It’s what happens afterwards that’s the problem.

Maybe the prospect hits the website and can’t find what he or she is looking for. Maybe the website is hard to navigate or the purchase buttons aren’t working right. Or maybe the person picks up the phone, but the salespeople aren’t friendly. (That happened to one of Mark’s clients — after he encouraged them to start recording inbound sales calls, they discovered that their salespeople had attitude problems!)

It was a great reminder that print, email, marketing collateral, and every other form of marketing communication is just one piece in the larger puzzle. If your clients are balking at spending money on direct mail, before trying to convert them to email or other channel just to keep their business, poke around a little. Find out if it’s direct mail really isn’t working for them or whether there is something else afoot.

Utilizing Multi-Channel Marketing, the Right Way

Wednesday, April 30th, 2014

What is Multi-Channel?

Multi-channel marketing is the use of many different channels, such as direct mail, print, digital, and social media platforms, to spread one consistent, comprehensive, and effective marketing campaign. As a marketing or print service provider, it is important to promote the solutions that enhance the life of your brand as well as your printing services throughout a variety of channels.

If your business is still around in 2014, chances are you have realized that multi-channel marketing is not the secret formula to success, but rather a necessary component to the continual transformation of your print-centric business. In fact, you’re probably reading this and thinking, well… duh! So the real question now has become, what is the secret to successfully establishing a printer’s role as a marketing service provider (MSP) in this rapidly changing industry?

The Success in the Solutions

When thinking about marketing your business and the services you provide, remember that with Internet at every professional’s fingertips, finding a service they need is as easy as the click of a mouse or touch of a finger. That’s why your marketing message needs to reach prospects on a variety of channels while promoting what your services can do for each individual prospect. Knowing your target audience means knowing what they need, even if they do not. Make your marketing customer-centric. Try to stay away from promoting what your service is, and focus on what it does for your customers. Keep in mind that in order to sell solutions in a multi-channel market, developing a plan and strategy is paramount.

Planning for Multi-Channel

So we’ve established the need for marketing your solutions as well as your customers’ solutions on multiple channels. The roadblock now is managing the time and effort that this kind of inbound approach requires. A lot of MSPs that I work with or consult for are not struggling to wrap their heads around what must be done, but rather how to possibly accomplish such layered campaigns, without running their marketing into the ground.

The most important component, and I cannot stress this enough, is developing a multi-channel strategy that incorporates both marketing and sales. Have your teams work together to establish the bottom line of your multi-channel efforts, define:

  • Who you want to reach; the target audience you want to stay in front of.
  • What you want to say; what makes your company the best choice? Why are you different from your competitors?
  • When will your multi-channel efforts be most effective?
  • Where will your multi-channel efforts be most effective?
  • Why are the tactics you have chosen the best path for success?
  • How can you establish an execution strategy to market not only your brand and solutions, but also your customers’?

Once you have answered these questions, map out your marketing campaigns with visual charts and calendars. Keep in mind that multi-channel marketing is not a sprint, but rather a carefully executed relay race between sales and marketing, which requires orchestrated and practiced handoffs, that when done right will drive your prospects down the funnel.

Fortunately for MSPs struggling to handle the volume of multi-channel marketing and communications, several technological advances in customer communications management have emerged.

Objects in the Mirror

If you drive a car, even if you don’t, chances are you know the classic warning, “objects in the mirror are closer than they appear.” These words, which we see daily, are a prevalent theme in the problems that printers and MSPs are presently facing. The classic predicament of knowing that something was coming, but not realizing it would approach so quickly, has left many businesses stuck in the dust of the industry leaders racing by.

My advice to you is to dedicate your time to developing a plan that will accomplish maintaining the standard of multi-channel marketing, which has pushed your top competitors to the head of the pack. Once you’ve mapped out your goals, tactics and execution strategy, stay tuned to my blog for insight and advice on the tools and best practices your business can implement to achieve positive recognition and grow your business in this multi-channel era.

To learn more about multi-channel marketing strategies, see my previous post, The Dos and Don’ts of Multi-Channel Marketing!

Are Your Customers Targeting Consumers Aged 65+? Check Their Channel Mix!

Friday, April 18th, 2014

According to just-released data from Pew Research Center, 41% of all adults 65+ still have no Internet access at home. This changes for more educated, affluent adults, but particularly for those who are older, less affluent, and who have physical or health conditions, print is still a critical part of the mix.

However, this is not a homogenous group. Within this demographic, the differences are striking. Among younger, affluent, and more educated 65+ consumers, the percentage going online and having broadband access at home is higher than the U.S. adult population overall. But among those with lower household incomes, particularly those with physical or health conditions, the percentages are much lower.

Digital enablement also varies significantly between younger and older adults in this group. As reported by MediaPost:

  • Among U.S. adults overall, 86% go online and 70% have broadband at home.
  • Among seniors with an annual household income of $75,000 or more, 90% go online and 82% have broadband at home. For seniors earning less than $30,000 annually, 39% go online and 25% have broadband at home.
  • 87% of seniors with a college degree go online, and 76% are broadband adopters. Among seniors who have not attended college, 40% go online and just 27% have broadband at home.
  • 68% of Americans in their early 70s go online, and 55% have broadband at home. By contrast, Internet adoption falls to 47% and broadband adoption falls to 34% among 75-79 year olds. [1]

If you have clients selling products into the 65+ demographic, this article is a must read for channel mix. It impacts the channel mix in terms of print vs. email, and if they are doing email, the type of email sent (text only vs. HTML for non-broadband users).

These results also mean that if your clients aren’t tracking their customers by household income, education, and more detailed age brackets, you need to be working with them to get this done.  The difference between great response and dismal response hangs in the balance.

Great Infographic to Share with Clients

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

Looking to convince clients that they need to make a greater investment in updating their databases? Here is a great infographic that makes the point in a powerful (but sometimes funny) way. The infographic relates to business data (such as changing address or phone numbers) more than it does consumers, but the point is made regardless.

For example,

  • In the 30 minutes you spent checking your mail, 127 companies changed phone numbers.
  • In the 25 minutes you spent commuting to work, 40 businesses changed locations.
  • In the 15 minutes you spent eating breakfast, 27 business changed names.

It also claims that bad data costs businesses $600 billion annually and up to 20% of revenue. It’s a great attention grabber . . . and a great excuse for your customers to let you help them update their marketing databases!

The infographic was created by Infogroup Targeting Solutions and shared by Marketing Profs.

Day Worth of Data

3D Printing in the Commercial Printing Industry: Think Dimensional Mail

Friday, April 11th, 2014

I’m stunned. I just looked back at my post on using 3D printing to drive digital printing and there are 68 shares on LinkedIn. I don’t think any post I have written — ever — has gotten that many LinkedIn shares. This tells me I’m on to something.

Part of the reason, I think, is that all of the discussions I’ve seen around 3D printing have to do with bringing existing products, services, and business models into our industry. That means discussion about whether printers should try to replicate what’s already being done, and done well, by companies that are far more entrenched and expert at it than printers are. Of course the answer to that is, “No!”

What nobody is talking about is how printers can apply the technology in a complementary way to drive more sales the products and services they already offer. That’s why I think that post resonated so much. As I discuss in the report “State of 3D Printing in the Commercial Printing Industry: 2014,” I believe 3D printing will provide significant opportunities for this industry, but most important applications will be the ones nobody has come up with yet (although I’ve proposed a few).

We are hearing many printers express concern that 3D-printed products are simply too expensive to be used in marketing campaigns, but I don’t think 3D printed products should try to compete with traditional response incentives or ad specialties. I believe 3D-printed products should be used for creating customized or personalized products (branded items), one-off products (personalized, highly unique incentives like action figures of company executives), or for ultra-short-run campaigns with a highly targeted audience.

In this, 3D printing would compete with dimensional mail. When going after corporate executives, marketers understand the value of sending a personalized box, complete with personalized marketing collateral, personalized sales letters, and personalized incentives ranging from radio-controlled cars to personalized baseballs. Now imagine a 12” action figure that looks just like the CEO of the target company staring out at the recipient (or his gatekeeper) from underneath a plastic window as part of a mailing box. I can imagine an open rate in that campaign of 100%.

So when thinking about 3D printing, forget replicating what’s already being done. Think how the technology can be applied in complementary ways to drive the business PSPs are already doing!

More Data Follies: Who’s Minding the Store?

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014

My penchant for publishing direct mail and data bloopers continues to win me great stories to share here on Digital Nirvana. This one came in this morning and left me scratching my head. My question for readers is this: Do you have processes in place to catch these mistakes before they get mailed? Or are you content to play clean-up later?

Last fall an environmental organization sent us an annual renewal notice which we responded to with a check to extend our membership for another year.

Five months later, we got another “renewal” notice to which we responded to with another check, not remembering that we had already renewed our annual membership. For this double renewal, we received a complimentary, inexpensive hat.

Four weeks later, we received an offer for us to become members for the first time, this time offering multiple more valuable premiums, including several shopping bags, a calendar, and a children’s gift (we’re retired).

Needless to say, I was not happy. I contacted the organization, and they quickly responded, apologized, and are sending yet more complimentary items.

We’re not interested in free gifts. My complaint to the organization was that, first, they were not acknowledging that we had already responded to their renewal request—twice. Also, that we were being penalized for our prompt response to the first notice by not receiving the multiple and higher valued items as our “free gifts,” which makes me feel like we’re being played. (Did we have to send another contribution to receive these annual renewal gifts? Are we being leveraged to send even more  money, even though we’d already renewed twice?)

It’s frustrating on both counts. It alienates the donor and makes it very clear that a favorable response has not been recognized—as in, “We didn’t notice you, so we’re sending you another renewal notice . . . in case you didn’t notice either,”  or “We don’t care that you responded, we’d  just like to get as much out of you as we can,” or, “Our tracking system is so inefficient we can’t distinguish between those who do and those who do not respond to our overtures.”

If this were not an organization that we would support anyway (and it were it not a non-profit but a direct business relationship), the likelihood of their getting a favorable response the next time the mailer came is pretty much zero!

This reader’s tongue-in-cheek writing style is so funny that you might be tempted to think this is an April Fool’s joke, but it is not. Rather, it has has shades of my father-in-law, Lt. Col. John Walker, U.S.M.C. (Ret.), who is regularly receiving solicitations to John Usmc and Col. Ret.

You would never let this happen to your clients, right?

Using 3D Printing to Drive Digital Print Marketing

Sunday, March 30th, 2014

For the last several months, I have been poking around, interviewing printers who have purchased 3D printers, reading 3D printing case studies, surveying 3D industry data, and trying to answer the question, “Is 3D printing relevant to the commercial printing industry?” The answer is yes, but not in the way I think many people believe.

One of the biggest opportunities for commercial printers, I believe, will come in using the production capabilities of these printers to drive the need for multi-channel marketing. Let me give one scenario.

Your client is a pediatric orthodontist who wants to increase his patient base, but there are several competing pediatric orthodontists in his geographic area. So you come up with an ingenious marketing plan that none of his competitors are using. You promote the dentist with a unique incentive for using his services — a 12″ action doll that looks just like the child. Then you purchase a list of households with a specific income level, with children under 18 years of age, within a specific geographic radius, and send out a postcard featuring a young girl with braces, with beaming smile, holding a 12″ action doll that looks just like her — braces and all.

Is this an expensive incentive? Yes, it is. But it’s only provided with the purchase of braces or other orthodonics. It can be printed in-house at the print shop or outsourced to a provider like ThatsMyFace.com. This model could be applied to nearly every market vertical. What incentive could be printed to encourage test drives of luxury vehicles? Or product demonstrations of high-dollar items. Say . . . a new digital printing press?

The value of 3D printing isn’t necessarily going to be in producing 3D-printed items for their own sake. It’s going to be for the larger marketing opportunities that these 3D-printed items create.

For more on 3D printing in the commercial printing industry, you can check out my article “Early 3D Adopters” in Printing Impressions or my report “The Status of 3D Printing in the Commercial Printing Industry.”